Individualized Nutrition, Pharmacy and Healthy Living

Health Concerns

  • 10 Cancer Fighting Foods

    by Paula Gallagher | October 7, 2015

    vegetables2When it comes to preventing and fighting cancer, anti-inflammatory foods are important. Adding nourishing foods full of healthy antioxidants is one of the easiest things you can do for yourself, if not the best. An anti-inflammatory diet rich in fruits and vegetables is key to keeping your body strong.

    Here are ten cancer fighting foods that have shown to have true benefits when it comes to building your immune system. Choose organic whenever possible.

    1. Apples – We are in the middle of apple season right now, and the varieties of apples available are fantastic. Studies show that apple skins inhibit the growth of cancer cells.

    2. Asian mushrooms – Shiitake, reishi, and maitake mushrooms boost the immune system. In a scientific review, researchers found that the metabolites contained within mushroom cell walls appeared to stimulate different cells of the immune system, including T and B cells, macrophages, and natural killer cells. Read more

  • 4 Ways to Reduce Breast Cancer Risk...Naturally

    by Paula Gallagher | October 6, 2015

    women-exerciseOne in eight women in the United States will develop invasive breast cancer over their lifetime, and of those, less than 15% are due to family history. Most breast cancers occur in women who have no family history of breast cancer. These occur due to genetic mutations that happen as a result of the aging process and lifestyle.

    There isn't much that can be done about family history or aging, but there are ways you can reduce breast cancer risk. Here are four ways you can help protect yourself, your friends, and your family members.

    1. Reduce your estrogen load: The Women’s Health Initiative Study published in 2002 confirmed that taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) increases our risk of developing invasive breast cancer by 26%. There are supplements that can help alleviate symptoms associated with menopause. Natural, or bioidentical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT) is another option that helps some safely women address hot flashes, night sweats, and the other symptoms of menopause. Read more

  • Orange Is the New Pink for Breast Cancer Prevention

    by Neal Barnard, MD | September 28, 2015

    orange-is-new-pinkDaily Beta-Carotene Intake Reduces Breast Cancer Risk by 19%

    Want to reduce your risk of breast cancer? Walk past the pink balloons, wrist bands, and packaged treats at the grocery store and head straight to the produce aisle. Orange is the new pink.

    Research shows women who consume 3 to 6 mg of beta-carotene – the amount you’ll find in six baby carrots, half a sweet potato, or one cup of mashed pumpkin – each day slash their risk of breast cancer by about 19%. Leafy greens count, too. One cup of steamed spinach, kale, and mustard greens provide at least 10 mg of beta-carotene, twice the amount recommended by the Institute of Medicine to mitigate breast cancer risk.

    If you don’t have a beta-carotene chart handy, then simply reach for foods with bright green, red, or orange hue.

    Here are some seasonal options to get you started: Read more

  • New Normal For Healthy Blood Pressure?

    by Paula Gallagher | September 22, 2015

    blood-pressure2Recommendations for healthy blood pressure numbers may change, as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced last week that aiming for a lower blood pressure rate saves more lives. The SPRINT Study (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) found that patients who got their blood pressure well below today’s usually recommended level significantly cut their risk of heart disease and death. The benefit was strong enough that NIH stopped the study about a year early.

    Approximately 1 in 3 American adults  has high blood pressure, raising the risk of heart attack, stroke, kidney failure and other health problems. Normal blood pressure is less than 120 over 80. High blood pressure is diagnosed once that measurement reaches, or passes, 140 over 90. Current guidelines recommend getting the top number (systolic pressure) down to about 140 in generally healthy adults and to 130 in patients who also have kidney disease or diabetes.

    NIH sponsored a nationwide study to test if aiming for a lower systolic rate would either help or harm. The study started in 2010 and looked at more than 9,300 high blood pressure patients. Half received an average of about two medications with the goal of lowering their systolic pressure below 140. The other half received an average of three medications with the goal of getting below 120. Read more

  • Stress and Weight Gain

    by Debi Silber, The Mojo Coach | September 1, 2015

    If you've noticed that you have put on a few pounds recently, particularly in your midsection, it could be due to chronic stress. Stress and weight gain can be linked. Find out why…

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