Individualized Nutrition, Pharmacy and Healthy Living

Health Concerns

  • Proton Pump Inhibitors Linked To Kidney Disease

    by Paula Gallagher | May 23, 2016

    sick-manAnother reason to be wary of antacids. Research published online in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology found that patients who regularly use proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may be at increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease.

    The new study findings are based on medical records from 173,321 Veterans Affairs patients who were prescribed a PPI and 20,270 other patients prescribed a histamine H2-receptor antagonist (H2-blocker). Over 5 years of follow-up, the results showed that 15 percent of people using PPIs were diagnosed with chronic kidney disease, versus 11 percent of those on H2-blockers. After the researchers weighed other factors, PPI users still had a 28 percent greater risk.

    Prilosec, Nexium and Prevacid are over the counter PPIs. Many people use them on a daily basis without realizing the negative consequences. A recent study also showed that long-term use of PPIs may be linked to Alzheimer's disease. It is important to know that most people can take steps to ease heartburn symptoms through lifestyle changes. Losing weight, avoiding fatty and salty foods, and not eating late at night can be very helpful.

    It is also critical to get to the root cause of the reflux. Consider doing micronutrient testing, food sensitivity testing, and testing to check for overgrowth of bad bacteria or yeast or H. pylori.

    In addition, nutrients and herbs can be a safe and effective approach to supporting gastrointestinal health. Deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL), glutamine, aloe, zinc carnosine, magnesium, digestive enzymes, and probiotics can all promote digestive wellness and help with reflux. One of my favorite digestive supplements is Pathway GI Optimal Support. Available in both capsule and powder form, this product provides comprehensive support for gut health.

    If you have any questions or concerns about the medication you are taking, we encourage you to talk to your doctor. We also invite you to call our health experts at Village Green to discuss natural ways to support your gastrointestinal health.

    Photo from here, with thanks.

  • Free Seminar on Risks of EMFs – Do US Government Standards Protect Us?

    by Paula Gallagher | May 16, 2016

    cell-phone-childDid you know that governments worldwide such as the UK, India, Israel and France are recommending people – and especially children – reduce exposure to wireless radiation? And, did you know that many household electronics have electric and magnetic field (EMF) emissions that can be easily remedied?

    Learn about how governments worldwide recommend the public – and especially children – reduce exposure to wireless radiation and risks of EMFs. Learn some little-known history about how FCC regulations for wireless evolved. Get the facts on the NIH rat study and why the EPA and the CDC flip-flopped on their public statements. Read more

  • Dinner Tonight: Cast Iron Frittata

    by Paula Gallagher | May 9, 2016

    frittataIn last week's blog about the importance of iron, it was mentioned that one of the ways to get iron in our diet was using cast iron cookware. Personally, I believe that everyone should own at least one heavy, good quality cast iron skillet. A cast iron skillet is an oven-proof, naturally nonstick tool that will actually last you a lifetime and could be also be one of the most used items in your kitchen.

    Aside from helping with iron levels, a cast iron pan is free of toxins such as PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid) and PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene), which can be a worry with many nonstick options.

    A favorite quick dinner meal is a frittata, using my cast iron skillet. Read more

  • Iron Deficiency – What You Need to Know

    by Paula Gallagher | May 4, 2016

    fatigueIron is the most abundant metal in the world and the most abundant trace element in the body, and about 70 percent of it is found in the blood. Yet iron deficiency anemia is the most common nutritional disorder in the world.

    The primary cause of iron deficiency is blood loss due to ulcers, cancer, hemorrhoids, or long-term aspirin use. Women are particularly vulnerable to iron deficiency during heavy menstrual periods, pregnancy, childbirth, and breastfeeding. Those with low dietary intake of iron (such as vegetarians) and malabsorption disorders such as celiac disease are also at risk.

    Iron is necessary for cell division, energy production, oxygen transport, and proper immune function. Iron deficiency symptoms can include: Read more

  • The Autism Exchange: A New Autism Resource

    by Margo Gladding | April 27, 2016

    We are excited to share a fantastic new resource called The Autism Exchange. It’s a user-friendly, interactive website for parents and professionals seeking reliable autism-related information such as special diets, lifestyle support, beneficial teaching methods, medical topics relating to autism spectrum disorders, alternative therapies, and helpful information for parents. In addition, The Autism Exchange allows users to quickly search directories for autism practitioners, supplement suppliers, autism blogs, testing labs, and compounding pharmacies, such as Village Green Apothecary.

    The Autism Exchange was created by a group of scientific advisers, who are some of the leading experts in the field. In fact, we are proud to mention that one of the members of the Scientific Advisory Board is Nutritionist and autism educator Dana Laake, RDH, MS, LDN, who hosts our radio show, Essentials of Healthy Living. Read more

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