Individualized Nutrition, Pharmacy and Healthy Living

Diet

  • Back-to-School Shopping? Power Up With the Healthy Basics

    by Neal Barnard, MD, FACC | August 31, 2016

    back-to-school-foodWhether you’re stocking up on school supplies or hosting a Labor Day party, make sure to add brightly-hued, plant-based foods to your family’s back-to-school shopping list.

    A diet packed with vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes provides our bodies with a steady supply of vitamins, nutrients, and minerals. This makes it easy to power through almost anything, whether it’s running a company, directing a car pool, or helping your child study for his or her next algebra test.

    Not sure where to start? Try one or all of these seasonal staples: Read more

  • New Sugar Limit Recommendations For Children

    by Paula Gallagher | August 30, 2016

    soda-drinkingThe American Heart Association (AHA) is suggesting that children consume no more than 6 teaspoons of added sugar per day. That is only 25 grams.

    According to the AHA, children are now getting way more than the suggested sugar limit of 25 grams and it is adversely affecting their health. A diet high in added sugars is strongly associated with weight gain, obesity, insulin resistance, abnormal cholesterol and fatty liver disease in children.

    What is added sugar? Added sugar is anything added to a food that it wouldn't normally contain. Table sugar, fructose, maple syrup or honey used as an ingredient in processing, preparing foods or beverages, eaten separately, or added to a meal at the dining table are all considered added sugar. Common foods that have added sugar are soft drinks, candy and baked goods.

    One can of soda alone contains on average 35 grams of sugar!!!!

    If you want to learn more about sugar and its effects on the body, watch the documentary Fed Up and read these five things you may not have known about sugar, but you should: Read more

  • The Documentary FED UP

    by Paula Gallagher | August 24, 2016

    documentary fed-upI ran across the documentary Fed Up while perusing Netflix one weekend. It is a film that investigates the food industry's influence on U.S. dietary guidelines and the resulting impact on the health of Americans.

    According the to documentary, many diseases can be attributed to the amount of sugar we consume on a daily basis. The amount has increased dramatically in less than 40 years and so have heart disease, diabetes and obesity. Sugar is added to everything – ketchup, pasta sauce, salad dressing, breakfast cereals, juice and energy drinks, baked goods, yogurt, and even baby formula. And more.

    The addiction to sugar starts young. Addiction? Yes, addiction. One  study showed that of 43 cocaine-addicted rats given the choice between cocaine and sugar water over 15 days, 40 of them opted for sugar!

    Another problem is that, unlike fat, protein, salt or any other nutrient, there is no recommended daily allowance for sugar. Look at a nutrition label. See what's missing? Read more

  • Want to Eat Like an Olympic Athlete? Seven Tips for a Healthy Gut

    by Susan Levin, MS, RD, CSSD | August 16, 2016

    fruits+vegetablesPrebiotics, like rice and beans, pair well with probiotics, like kimchi, and may provide a natural doping effect, powering athletes through their training and to the 2016 Olympic Games.

    Olympic athletes often make waves for all-star performances and for bringing home the gold, but few talk about one of the secrets to staying in the game: a healthy gut.

    While additional research is needed, preliminary findings suggest probiotics – available in fermented foods like sauerkraut, kimchi and miso – may provide a natural and clean “doping effect” when paired with prebiotics, or fiber-packed foods. Read more

  • Say No to Sugary Drinks with These Infused Water Recipes

    by Paula Gallagher | July 25, 2016

    fruit-waterIt's hot outside and cold drinks are in. But instead of sweet iced tea, iced lattes and sugary lemonade, quench your thirst with homemade flavored water.

    Sugar consumption is a real problem in the U.S. The  World Health Organization recommends no more than 5% of your daily caloric intake come from added sugar. For the average adult with a normal body mass index (BMI), 5% amounts to 25 g, or approximately 2 tablespoons of sugar.

    Apparently, sugar must be too easy to swallow, because Americans on average consume 10 times that amount per day – and the biggest culprit is beverages. Not only does consuming this much sugar lead to weight gain, but it is also associated with an increased risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and gout, and it has even been linked to cancer.

    Your best bet to beat the heat and stay hydrated is good old water. Read more

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