Individualized Nutrition, Pharmacy and Healthy Living

Diet

  • The Documentary FED UP

    by Paula Gallagher | August 24, 2016

    documentary fed-upI ran across the documentary Fed Up while perusing Netflix one weekend. It is a film that investigates the food industry's influence on U.S. dietary guidelines and the resulting impact on the health of Americans.

    According the to documentary, many diseases can be attributed to the amount of sugar we consume on a daily basis. The amount has increased dramatically in less than 40 years and so have heart disease, diabetes and obesity. Sugar is added to everything – ketchup, pasta sauce, salad dressing, breakfast cereals, juice and energy drinks, baked goods, yogurt, and even baby formula. And more.

    The addiction to sugar starts young. Addiction? Yes, addiction. One  study showed that of 43 cocaine-addicted rats given the choice between cocaine and sugar water over 15 days, 40 of them opted for sugar!

    Another problem is that, unlike fat, protein, salt or any other nutrient, there is no recommended daily allowance for sugar. Look at a nutrition label. See what's missing? Read more

  • Want to Eat Like an Olympic Athlete? Seven Tips for a Healthy Gut

    by Susan Levin, MS, RD, CSSD | August 16, 2016

    fruits+vegetablesPrebiotics, like rice and beans, pair well with probiotics, like kimchi, and may provide a natural doping effect, powering athletes through their training and to the 2016 Olympic Games.

    Olympic athletes often make waves for all-star performances and for bringing home the gold, but few talk about one of the secrets to staying in the game: a healthy gut.

    While additional research is needed, preliminary findings suggest probiotics – available in fermented foods like sauerkraut, kimchi and miso – may provide a natural and clean “doping effect” when paired with prebiotics, or fiber-packed foods. Read more

  • Say No to Sugary Drinks with These Infused Water Recipes

    by Paula Gallagher | July 25, 2016

    fruit-waterIt's hot outside and cold drinks are in. But instead of sweet iced tea, iced lattes and sugary lemonade, quench your thirst with homemade flavored water.

    Sugar consumption is a real problem in the U.S. The  World Health Organization recommends no more than 5% of your daily caloric intake come from added sugar. For the average adult with a normal body mass index (BMI), 5% amounts to 25 g, or approximately 2 tablespoons of sugar.

    Apparently, sugar must be too easy to swallow, because Americans on average consume 10 times that amount per day – and the biggest culprit is beverages. Not only does consuming this much sugar lead to weight gain, but it is also associated with an increased risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and gout, and it has even been linked to cancer.

    Your best bet to beat the heat and stay hydrated is good old water. Read more

  • Parsley and Dill May Help Prevent Cancer

    by Paula Gallagher | July 20, 2016

    parsley-dillA new study published in the Journal of Natural Products has found that the combination of parsley and dill may help prevent cancer.

    Scientists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), the N. D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry (RAS), the Institute of Developmental Biology (RAS) and the Institute of Cell Biophysics (RAS) found that when parsley and dill seeds were combined, a compound called glaziovianin A was produced. This compound along with its structural analogs was found to inhibit the growth of tumor cells. This compound already exists and is currently harvested from the leaves of the Brazilian tree Ateleia glazioviana Baill, but production is costly. Read more

  • Food: It's Not About Willpower

    by Debi Silber, The Mojo Coach | July 19, 2016

    binge-eatingIf you’re like many of my clients, you may have struggled for years, often decades, having a dysfunctional relationship with food. Food and emotions are so intertwined, which can lead us to eat for any number of reasons other than physical hunger. We can eat socially, mindlessly, emotionally, or have binge-eating behaviors that keep us overweight, frustrated, exhausted and unhappy. But it's not just about willpower.

    Binge eating can happen because:

    We’re over-hungry, which leads to overeating.
    We haven’t created a strategic plan for our eating.
    A trigger (person, place, thought or feeling) encourages a binge. Read more

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