Individualized Nutrition, Pharmacy and Healthy Living

Diet

  • Dinner Tonight: Miso French Onion Soup

    by Paula Gallagher | October 21, 2014

    French-onion-soupI remember the first time I had French onion soup. I was in college and had gone over to a friend's house for dinner. Her mom brought us these handled bowls full of steamy soup, covered in bread and cheese. From that moment on, French onion soup became a favorite.

    As the days turn a little chillier, this soup becomes a staple. The following recipe uses miso paste instead of the traditional beef broth. A staple in Asia for thousands of years, miso is made from soybeans fermented with a grain such as brown rice or barley. The result is a tasty, salty condiment that is live with bacterial culture and excellent for promoting gastrointestinal health. Soybeans also contain lecithin, which provides key ingredients for brain neurotransmitters, an excellent way to boost brain function. The onions provide sulphoraphanes, which increase immunity, counter free-radical damage, and fight cancer.

    French Onion Soup

    1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
    4 yellow onions, thinly sliced
    2 cups water
    3 Tbsp miso paste
    4 slices whole wheat French bread
    4 tsp seeded mustard
    1 cup Swiss or mozzarella cheese or dairy free equivalent, grated

    In a large pot, warm oil over low heat and add onions. Caramelize the onions by cooking them slowly for about 1 1/2 hours, stirring every 20 minutes. I know it is a long time, but definitely worth it to get sweet, delicious onions.  Read more

  • Delicious Fall Recipe for Chai Ginger Apple Cider

    by Paula Gallagher | October 14, 2014

    apple-cider-ginger-chaiChai ginger apple cider is a delicious warming beverage that is the perfect end to a crisp fall day. The ginger is a great digestive aid and the aromas from immune-boosting chai spices will make your whole house smell like you have been baking all day. Chai tea is a traditional Indian tea made from black tea with spices added to it, such as cinnamon. It’s certainly delicious, but make sure when choosing it that you opt for a traditional healthy variety, rather than one with added sweeteners or syrups. Organic tea is best, if you can get it.

    - 6 cups apple cider
    - 2 chai tea bags (regular or decaffeinated)
    - 1 inch slice of fresh ginger, peeled and left whole

    In a small saucepan, bring 1 cup apple cider to a boil, then add the chai tea bags and ginger. Remove from heat, cover, and steep for 45 minutes.

    In a large saucepan, combine remaining 5 cups of apple cider with prepared 1 cup chai tea-infused cider. Bring to a gentle boil. Remove from heat. Serve with a cinnamon stick!

    Recipe care of Hyhope Farms.

    Photo from here, with thanks.

  • Dinner Tonight: Kale Salad with Cranberry Dressing

    by Paula Gallagher | October 7, 2014

    kaleThis coming weekend is always a little bittersweet. Here in Canada, our family celebrates Thanksgiving, but we also close down our cottage for the winter every year at this time. For us, this is the true marker of summer end, and the beginning of cold weather.

    But it is also usually the nicest weekend to be at our cottage. Crisp cool mornings, beautifully colored leaves, no bugs, and the best part... Thanksgiving dinner!

    We have a very rustic, yet fairly traditional Thanksgiving dinner with turkey, stuffing, potatoes, corn, and this year, kale salad with cranberry dressing. I had this at a friend’s house the other night – it was delicious and the perfect complement to a traditional meal.

    Kale is a winter collard and at only 36 calories per cup, it provides a boat-load of nutritional goodness. Every serving of kale provides:

    • Over 10% of our RDA for calcium and copper
    • 25% manganese
    • 88% vitamin C
    • 192% beta carotene
    • A whopping 1,325% vitamin K (required for blood clotting)

    It also offers good levels of B vitamins, vitamin E, potassium, tryptophan, essential fatty acids, dietary fiber, and carotenoids such as lutein, that contribute to eye health.

    Combined with cranberries, which are also nutrient-rich and packed full of disease-fighting antioxidants, this salad is not only super healthy, but also super delicious.

    Kale Salad

    • 6 cups of kale (take off stems and tear into small bite-sized pieces)
    • 1/4 cup roughly chopped pecans

    Dressing

    • 1 cup fresh cranberries
    • 1 cup chopped onion
    • 1 garlic clove, minced
    • 2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
    • 1 Tbsp maple syrup
    • 1/2 tsp ground black pepper
    • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
    • 1/4 tsp sea salt
    • 2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

    In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, combine all dressing ingredients, except olive oil. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover, and cook for 10 minutes. Transfer mixture to a mini food processor or blender and add olive oil. Pulse to combine, leaving dressing slightly chunky for texture. Cool completely.

    To prepare salad, in a large bowl, gently squeeze the torn kale leaves (this breaks down the fibers, making it easier to eat). Mix in chopped pecans. Toss with 1/2 cup of dressing (or more to taste).

    Enjoy!

    Photo from here, with thanks.

  • Dinner Tonight: Pumpkin Pancakes

    by Paula Gallagher | October 1, 2014

    pumpkin'Tis the season for all things pumpkin flavored, from candy to your morning coffee... and even beer. In fact, in the last 5 years, pumpkin sales have increased a whopping 34% (USDA). Pumpkin is loaded with antioxidants that contribute to good vision, healthy skin, a strong immune system, and bone and teeth development. It’s also a good source of vitamins A, C, K, and E, as well as the minerals magnesium, potassium, and iron.

    However, if you really want to reap the benefits of this winter squash, skip the candy, beer and coffee and enjoy it pureed in this delicious pumpkin pancake recipe. I cheat a little with this recipe and use a pre-made pancake mix (I like Bob's Red Mills).

    1 cup organic soy or almond milk, unsweetened
    1 egg
    1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
    1/2 cup organic pure pumpkin purée, unseasoned
    3/4 cup whole grain pancake mix
    2 Tbsp wheat germ
    1 tsp cinnamon
    butter (for frying pancakes)

    In medium bowl whisk together milk, egg, oil, and pumpkin. Add pancake mix, wheat germ and cinnamon. Stir well.

    Heat a large frying pan over medium heat. Add a small amount of butter to lightly coat the pan. Pour 1/4 cup batter for each pancake and cook until deep golden brown. Flip and cook the other side until done. Serve with a little maple syrup and some chopped nuts!

    I actually make smaller versions of these and stack them up in a short, squat thermos, and they stay hot for my son's school lunch.

    Photo from here, with thanks.

  • Digestive Health Series: Acid Reflux

    by Paula Gallagher | September 30, 2014

    heartburnIn this weekly series, we will look at digestive health and natural approaches to related problems like candida, irritable bowel syndrome, acid reflux, and food allergies.

    The first issue we will tackle is acid reflux. Acid reflux or heartburn occurs when stomach acid rises up into the esophagus. This results from the lower esophageal sphincter not closing properly. Normally the sphincter closes as soon food passes through it and it should not allow back flow of food or stomach acid. However, when the sphincter either doesn’t close all the way or it opens too often, stomach acid moves into the esophagus causing uncomfortable symptoms.

    Symptoms can include:

    • Chest pain/burning sensation
    • Dental erosion
    • Asthma
    • Belching
    • Difficulty swallowing
    • Hoarseness
    • Sore throat
    • Regurgitation of food

    Read more

Items 1 to 5 of 245 total

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. ...
  7. 49
SSL