Individualized Nutrition, Pharmacy and Healthy Living


  • Dinner Tonight: Beet Pancakes

    by Paula Gallagher | February 25, 2015

    beet-pancakesThis is a sneaky and delicious way to get your children to benefit from beets, especially if they are picky eaters. These pancakes are served routinely at my daughter's daycare. Beets are rich in folate, as well as betacyanin (giving beets their purple/red color). Betacyanin has been found to possess a cancer-fighting ability. And kids especially love that they are eating pink pancakes!

    Beet Pancakes

    1 medium-sized beet, peeled and chopped
    1 1/4 cups whole wheat or oat flour
    1 tsp  cinnamon, divided
    1 1/2 tsp baking powder
    1/4 tsp salt
    1 cup milk
    1/2 cup plain yogurt
    1 medium banana
    1 large free-range egg
    1 Tbsp unsalted butter

    Place beet in a steamer basket and set over at least 1 inch of water, and steam until tender. Set aside to cool.

    In a large bowl, stir together whole wheat or oat flour, 3/4 tsp cinnamon, baking powder and salt. Place beet, milk, yogurt and banana in blender container and blend until smooth. Blend in egg. Add beet mixture to dry ingredients and gently combine. Let the batter rest for 10 minutes. Read more

  • Vitamin D Deficiency and Type 2 Diabetes

    by Paula Gallagher | February 24, 2015

    sun-baskingHere's another reason to make sure you are getting enough of the sunshine vitamin. A new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism has shown that vitamin D deficiency and type 2 diabetes are linked in that people who do not get enough vitamin D are at higher risk of having diabetes, regardless of their weight.

    The results show that vitamin D levels were more closely linked to blood sugar levels than BMI, according to the study. Whether or not vitamin D played a role in causing diabetes or other disorders that affect the metabolism of glucose is unknown and further studies will need to be done.

    “The major strength of this study is that it compares vitamin D levels in people at a wide range of weights (from lean to morbidly obese subjects) while taking whether they had diabetes into account,” said one of the study’s authors, Mercedes Clemente-Postigo, MSc, of Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Málaga (IBIMA). They also went on to say that, "The study suggests that vitamin D deficiency and obesity interact synergistically to heighten the risk of diabetes and other metabolic disorders. The average person may be able to reduce their risk by maintaining a healthy diet and getting enough outdoor activity." Read more

  • Children's Series: Preventing Colds

    by Paula Gallagher | February 23, 2015

    child-sleepingWILL THIS WINTER HAVE NO END? If you are anywhere near the northern east coast, it sure doesn't feel like spring is just weeks away. And with the never-ending winter, come never-ending colds, especially for kids. Preventing colds can be a challenge, but there are some things you can do to help.

    Often colds are caused by viruses that are found in invisible droplets in the air, which we either breathe or touch. And with children in schools, daycare, and sports, they have more opportunity to catch something. That, combined with what is most likely less than ideal hygiene practices.

    More than 100 different viruses can infiltrate the protective lining of the nose and throat, triggering an immune system reaction that can cause a sore throat and headache, and make it hard to breathe through the nose. Dry air (indoors or outdoors) can lower the resistance to infection, causing more colds in the winter. Underlying allergies can also decrease resistance and allow a virus to infect the body. Maintaining a healthy immune system is the best protection against colds. Read more

  • 5 Tips for a Healthy Heart

    by Paula Gallagher | February 18, 2015

    heartFebruary is American Heart Month and according to the American Heart Association, about 2,150 Americans die each day from these diseases. That is one every 40 seconds. Cardiovascular diseases claim more lives than all forms of cancer combined.

    Scary, right? But here is the good news. Since heart disease is usually a result of lifestyle choices you make every day, you can begin to make new choices, starting today, that will significantly decrease your risk of developing or dying from a cardiovascular condition, no matter where your heart’s health stands right now.

    Here are five tips for a healthier heart:

    1. Watch and know your weight. In a world of increasingly less activity, thanks to computers and smart phones leading to more sedentary lifestyles, as well as consuming more food,  we are at our fattest ever. Your weight relative to your height is an important indicator of your cardiovascular disease risk. While you don't need to weigh yourself everyday, knowing what you should weigh is a good baseline.  Get to know your BMI, as well. Body Mass Index (BMI) is a number calculated from a person's weight and height. Anything over 30 is considered obese. Read more

  • Village Green Welcomes Pharmacist Emily Shewmaker

    by Paula Gallagher | February 17, 2015

    Emily-ShewmakerWe are excited to welcome pharmacist Emily Shewmaker, Pharm.D., to the Village Green Apothecary team. Emily brings over 10 years of experience as a pharmacist and has certifications in patient diabetes care, immunization, holistic health and nutrition and smoking cessation.

    Her goals at the pharmacy are to bring utmost customer service and most importantly empower customers to take control of their health.

    Emily enjoys spending time with her family, cooking with real food, and playing various sports. She has a passion for optimizing health from the inside out, using a primary (lifestyle) and secondary (dietary) food model.

    If you have questions about your prescriptions, including drug/nutrient interactions, please stop by and meet Emily.

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