Individualized Nutrition, Pharmacy and Healthy Living


  • Rx for Winter Skin

    by Paula Gallagher | March 3, 2015

    coconut-oilDry, flaky, itchy skin is common, but even more so in the winter because there is less humidity in the cool air, causing the natural moisture in your body to evaporate more quickly. Even the heat in the house can contribute to the dryness and itchiness.

    So here are some tips to soothing dry, itchy winter skin:

    1. Exfoliate. Gently brush your body with a dry loofah or dry skin brush before you turn on the shower. This will help get rid of dead skin cells that can cause that flaky look. It also helps your skin pores breathe.

    2. Turn down the heat in the shower. Long hot showers strip the body of its natural moisturizing oils. Cooler, shorter showers may not feel great in the moment but will be better for your skin in the long run.

    3. Moisturize, moisturize, moisturize. Keep a bottle of almond oil or jojoba oil right in the shower and apply it all over your skin as soon as you turn the water off. Towel off gently and then apply a rich cream all over your body. My favorites are Egyptian Magic and plain organic Coconut Oil. Read more

  • Children's Series: Allergies

    by Paula Gallagher | March 2, 2015

    allergiesAllergies can be annoying, to say the least. But in some cases, they can also be debilitating and even deadly. And even more so in children.

    Allergies are hypersensitivity reactions to normally harmless substances. In allergic rhinitis, the immune system releases histamines and other chemicals to fight the “allergen.” As a result, swelling (inflammation) and congestion of the nasal passages and increased mucus production occurs. Allergies can cause a variety of uncomfortable symptoms, but commonly children experience stuffy or runny nose, sneezing, itchy skin and eyes. Allergies can be seasonal or chronic, depending on the allergen. And the allergen can be anything from peanuts to mold to feathers. As children age, they can “outgrow” their allergies as their immune system matures.

    Here are five tips help with decreasing symptoms associated with allergies.

    1. Supplement. Nutrients such as bioflavonoids, calcium, magnesium, carotenoids, essential fatty acids, selenium, B vitamins, and vitamin C work to help with inflammation, reduce allergic symptoms, soothe irritated mucus membranes, and support immune function. Click here to see what supplements can be beneficial for your child. Don't forget to consult with an expert to see what is best. Read more

  • Dinner Tonight: Beet Pancakes

    by Paula Gallagher | February 25, 2015

    beet-pancakesThis is a sneaky and delicious way to get your children to benefit from beets, especially if they are picky eaters. These pancakes are served routinely at my daughter's daycare. Beets are rich in folate, as well as betacyanin (giving beets their purple/red color). Betacyanin has been found to possess a cancer-fighting ability. And kids especially love that they are eating pink pancakes!

    Beet Pancakes

    1 medium-sized beet, peeled and chopped
    1 1/4 cups whole wheat or oat flour
    1 tsp  cinnamon, divided
    1 1/2 tsp baking powder
    1/4 tsp salt
    1 cup milk
    1/2 cup plain yogurt
    1 medium banana
    1 large free-range egg
    1 Tbsp unsalted butter

    Place beet in a steamer basket and set over at least 1 inch of water, and steam until tender. Set aside to cool.

    In a large bowl, stir together whole wheat or oat flour, 3/4 tsp cinnamon, baking powder and salt. Place beet, milk, yogurt and banana in blender container and blend until smooth. Blend in egg. Add beet mixture to dry ingredients and gently combine. Let the batter rest for 10 minutes. Read more

  • Vitamin D Deficiency and Type 2 Diabetes

    by Paula Gallagher | February 24, 2015

    sun-baskingHere's another reason to make sure you are getting enough of the sunshine vitamin. A new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism has shown that vitamin D deficiency and type 2 diabetes are linked in that people who do not get enough vitamin D are at higher risk of having diabetes, regardless of their weight.

    The results show that vitamin D levels were more closely linked to blood sugar levels than BMI, according to the study. Whether or not vitamin D played a role in causing diabetes or other disorders that affect the metabolism of glucose is unknown and further studies will need to be done.

    “The major strength of this study is that it compares vitamin D levels in people at a wide range of weights (from lean to morbidly obese subjects) while taking whether they had diabetes into account,” said one of the study’s authors, Mercedes Clemente-Postigo, MSc, of Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Málaga (IBIMA). They also went on to say that, "The study suggests that vitamin D deficiency and obesity interact synergistically to heighten the risk of diabetes and other metabolic disorders. The average person may be able to reduce their risk by maintaining a healthy diet and getting enough outdoor activity." Read more

  • Children's Series: Preventing Colds

    by Paula Gallagher | February 23, 2015

    child-sleepingWILL THIS WINTER HAVE NO END? If you are anywhere near the northern east coast, it sure doesn't feel like spring is just weeks away. And with the never-ending winter, come never-ending colds, especially for kids. Preventing colds can be a challenge, but there are some things you can do to help.

    Often colds are caused by viruses that are found in invisible droplets in the air, which we either breathe or touch. And with children in schools, daycare, and sports, they have more opportunity to catch something. That, combined with what is most likely less than ideal hygiene practices.

    More than 100 different viruses can infiltrate the protective lining of the nose and throat, triggering an immune system reaction that can cause a sore throat and headache, and make it hard to breathe through the nose. Dry air (indoors or outdoors) can lower the resistance to infection, causing more colds in the winter. Underlying allergies can also decrease resistance and allow a virus to infect the body. Maintaining a healthy immune system is the best protection against colds. Read more

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